Forget The Big Bang Theory: Model Suggests Universe Was Born From Two Cosmos COLLIDING

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THE four-dimensional universe that we live in was born from two three-dimensional universes colliding, a leading expert has claimed.

A Princeton University physicist claims that the universe was created when two 3D universes collided.

The theory, known as the ‘Ekpyrotic Model’, goes against the conventional Big Bang theory, which suggests that the universe began from a single point and has been expanding infinitely ever since.

The universe was born from two worlds colliding


While the Big Bang theory suggests that the universe began in a very hot and dense state, the Ekpyrotic Model dictates that it actually began extremely cold.

Paul Steinhardt of Princeton University who proposed the theory said: “Instead of beginning with nearly infinite temperature and density, the universe began in a very different state - cold and nearly vacuous.
“The hot expanding universe we know came as a result of collision that brought the universe up to a large but finite temperature and density.
 “The rest of the story is as the Big Bang model would have it, but the beginning is different.” With the Big Bang theory, Mr. Steinhardt believes that there is “no natural mechanism for making stars, galaxies and larger scale structures in the universe.”
The Ekpyrotic model suggests that “our hot big bang universe was created from the collision of two three-dimensional worlds moving along a hidden, extra dimension.
“The two three-dimensional worlds collide and `stick’, the kinetic energy in the collision is converted the quarks, electrons, photons, etc., that are confined to move along three dimensions.
 “The resulting temperature is finite, so the hot big bang phase begins without a singularity. “This would mean that the universe would have the perfect environment to create star, galaxies and everything in it that we know because “because the collision and initiation of the big bang phase occurs nearly simultaneously everywhere.”
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