If The Big Bang Started The Universe, What, Or Who, Started The Big Bang? What About The Multi-Verse?

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When it comes to the origins of life, or what we believe to be “reality,” there is no shortage of theories. Despite how unanswerable this question may seem, theories will always emerge attempting to account for the many ‘unknowns’ we have yet to understand and discover. One thing is for certain, however: Despite the fact that we still have much to learn, we’ve come a long way in understanding the true nature of our reality.



The Big Bang theory implies that everything in existence resulted from a single event that launched the creation of the entire universe and that everything in existence today was once part of what’s referred to as the “singularity,” a single, infinitely dense point.

This of course begs the question, if the Big Bang created the universe, who or what created the Big Bang? And who or what created whatever created that?

At any rate, it remains the most popular theory behind the origin of the universe, born of the observation that other galaxies are moving away from our own at tremendous speeds, in all directions, as if being propelled by a very powerful force.

Big Bang believers suggest that this event occurred approximately 15 billion years ago, from some ancient, unknown type of energy.
National Geographic explains that, according to this theory, “in the instant—a trillion-trillionth of a second—after the big bang, the universe expanded with incomprehensible speed from its pebble-size origin to astronomical scope. Expansion has apparently continued, but much more slowly, over the ensuing billions of years.”
The origins of this theory stem from Georges Lemaitre, a Belgian priest who proposed that the universe came from a single primordial atom. After Edwin Hubble’s observation that galaxies are hurtling away from us, the theory gained more traction.

That being said, it’s just a theory, yet many accept it as fact. The truth is, we simply don’t know, and can only make educated guesses. Several major questions remain unanswered, the most popular one illustrated in the image below.

The book Gravitation by Wheeler, Thorne, and Meisner is one of the more foundational books in physics, as it explains the origins of this theory. Many novice physics students have to read this book in their studies. On page 719, you find the current and most accepted model of the known universe, according to the standard model, which is a drawing of a guy blowing up a balloon with pennies glued to it. The balloon represents the universe expanding as it is being blown up and the pennies glued to the balloon move away from each other as the universe expands.

Yet, according to Nassim Haramein, the Director of Research for the Resonance Project:
If, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, then why have we not heard about “The Big Contraction”?! “For every action there is an equal opposite reaction.” is one of the most foundation and proven concepts in all of physics. Therefore, if the universe is expanding then “the guy” (or whatever “he” is), who is blowing up that balloon, has to have some huge lungs that are contracting to be able to blow it up. This a concept that Nassim Haramein began exploring when creating an alternative unified field theory to explain the universe.
He felt that there had to be something fundamental and universal that was contracting in order to cause the expansion of the universe, and that the current theory does not account for this. His work has led him to develop his unified field theory, which “includes an explanation for the expansion of the universe. The thing that is contracting and allowing for the expansion of the universe is space itself, not just curving as Einstein suggested, but curling toward singularity at every point.”

Below is a great talk given by him. After researching this topic myself, I believe non-material science is a fundamental key to discovering the origins of our universe. Most of physical reality is birthed from the non-physical, from “empty space.”
“No point is more central than this, that empty space is not empty. It is the seat of the most violent physics.”
– John Archibald Wheeler
“Space is actually not empty and it’s full of energy. The energy in space is not trivial, there’s a lot of it, and we can actually calculate how much energy there is in that space and that reality might actually come out of it, that everything we see is actually emerging from that space.” — Nassim Haramein
Below is an excellent talk discussing this.

Another factor that supports the Big Bang theory, in a sense, is Quantum Entanglement, a phenomenon that Einstein thought was so “spooky” that it could not be valid. It suggests two things, either that the “space” between physical objects isn’t actually empty space as our senses perceive it to be, or that information is travelling faster than the speed of light, or, better yet, instantaneously, with no “time” involved. It implies that everything is connected, that if there was a “Big Bang,” it happened when all physical matter was one, and then exploded out into little pieces that spread throughout the cosmos. The tricky part to understand is that all those little pieces, those planets, those stars, and all the intelligent life that has most certainly formed, is still all connected in some way we have yet to understand.
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Astronomy

astrophysics

Big Bang

cosmology

multiverse

Physics

Quantum Entanglement

Quantum Mechanics

space

universe

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