IF THERE IS NO OXYGEN IN SPACE, HOW DOES THE SUN BURN?

The Sun does not necessarily "burn", as we think happens when we set fire to paper. The sun shines because it is a very large gas ball, and a process called nuclear fusion is occurring at its core. The temperature of the Sun in this layer is about 15 million degrees Celsius. Hydrogen atoms are compressed and melted, creating helium.

 

Nuclear fusion occurs when there is a junction of chemical elements. The energy emitted in the process eventually grows from the center (or core) of the star to the outside, finally leaving the surface and radiating into space to be the heat and light we know the stars emit.

People, including scientists, sometimes say that the sun "burns hydrogen" to make it shine. But this is just a way to simplify. Hydrogen does not really burn, it melts, in helium, as was quoted just above. In short, the Sun is a great natural nuclear reactor.

By having heavily heated gases, the Sun can be termed as a plasma ball, rather than a fire. These processes that quickly release energy lead to this heating, and thus the emission of light and heat.

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