Leonardo DiCaprio pledges to fund $5 Million to help fight Amazon fires


Related image

An environmental fund backed by Leonardo DiCaprio has pledged $5 million to help fight Amazon fires - just days after he shared inaccurate photos of the blaze.

Earth Alliance was created last month by DiCaprio and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs' widow, Laurene Powell Jobs, and philanthropist Brian Sheth who launched the fundraising project on Sunday. 

The team from the Amazon Forest Fund are seeking donations to help repair the Brazilian rain forest, described as the 'lungs of the planet'.

This came days after DiCaprio shared a photograph from a previous fire in the Amazon which was actually taken in 2018, calling the fires 'terrifying,' according to Fox News.

Brazilian federal experts reported a record number of wildfires across the country this year, up 84 percent over the same period in 2018.

 An environmental fund backed by Leonardo DiCaprio will help indigenous people battle the fires The group, Earth Alliance, have pledged $5 million dollars to help battle the fires in the Amazon (above)

An environmental fund backed by Leonardo DiCaprio (left) has pledged $5 million to help battle the fires in the Amazon (right)

 Neri dos Santos Silva, center, watches an encroaching fire threat after digging trenches to keep the flames from spreading to the farm he works on, in the Nova Santa Helena municipality, in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, on Friday

Neri dos Santos Silva, center, watches an encroaching fire threat after digging trenches to keep the flames from spreading to the farm he works on, in the Nova Santa Helena municipality, in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, on Friday

 The pledge came days after DiCaprio shared what he believed to be a photo of this year's fires in the Amazon (above). Reports would later reveal that the image was in fact from 2018

The pledge came days after DiCaprio shared what he believed to be a photo of this year's fires in the Amazon (above). Reports would later reveal that the image was in fact from 2018

Similarly actor Jaden Smith and YouTube star Logan Paul also shared a photo of a burning forest originally published by The Guardian in 1989.

DiCaprio wrote on Instagram: 'Earth Alliance is committed to helping protect the natural world.

'We are deeply concerned about the ongoing crisis in the Amazon, which highlights the delicate balance of climate, biodiversity, and the wellbeing of indigenous peoples.'

Earlier in the week, he posted about the plight of those living in the Amazon as the fires look like they are headed into their third week of burning.

The area is home to one million indigenous people and three million species.

The actor urged people to consider donating to front line groups in the Amazon and the Rainforest Alliance who help the 'world's most vulnerable tropical forests.'

DiCaprio attributed part of the problem to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro who he says allowed farmers and loggers to 'clear the land' after taking office in January.

He suggested people should be conscious about their food consumption - only buying from companies with 'responsible supply chains' - and consider eliminating or reducing beef consumption.

Finally he wrote that the public should continue to share and raise awareness - despite his personal gaffe. As well as voting for leaders who recognize the 'urgency of our climate crisis'.

The funds will be distributed to five local groups working to combat the problem: Instituto Associacao Floresta Protegida, Coordination of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon, Instituto Kabu, Instituto Raoni, and Instituto Socioambiental.

 A tract of the Amazon jungle burns as it is cleared by loggers and farmers in Porto Velho, Brazil (above), on Saturday

A tract of the Amazon jungle burns as it is cleared by loggers and farmers in Porto Velho, Brazil (above), on Saturday

The Amazon is the world's largest rain forest measuring at five million square kilometers - a landmass equivalent to Mexico two and half times over.

The massive wonder spans nine countries: Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.

It is described as an 'enormous carbon sink' as it is estimated to hold 100 years of carbon emission by humans, Aljazeera wrote.

Christian Poirier, Brazil programme director for NGO Amazon Watch, wrote: 'The Amazon is the most significant climate stabilizer we have, it creates 20 per cent of the air we breathe and it also holds 20 per cent of the fresh flowing water on the planet.'  

NASA estimated that forest destruction has soared more than 278 per cent in July, compared to the same month last year.

The organization added: 'Total fire activity across the Amazon basin has been close to the average in comparison to the past 15 years.

'Though activity appears to be above average in the states of Amazonas and Rondonia, it has so far appeared below average in Mato Grosso and Para.'

To find out more or to donate visit: www.ealliance.org/amazonfund.

Comments